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Colour my world

We visit designer and florist Sarah Ryhanen, and her four-legged bud Nea, at their glorious flower farm in Montgomery County, New York.

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Colour my world

You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who doesn’t appreciate flowers. Yes, when cut, they will eventually wither, but the joy that comes from receiving (or giving) a bunch, is hard to match. So it stands to reason that Worlds End, a flower farm in Montgomery County, New York, could be one of the most delightful places on Earth.

Originally purchased in 2011 by self-taught designer and florist Sarah Ryhanen and partner Eric, the property has flourished into a fully-fledged flower oasis that specialises in unusual, hard-to find blooms. Flowers flourish differently, if not better out in nature, and the farm has been developed slowly but carefully over the years to ensure the quality of the plants. And these are not your standard roses and peonies either—think “the unusual, weedy, wild stuff” Ryhanen says has informed her work over the years.

Some flowers are sold at Ryhanen’s Brooklyn-based flower store Saipua, a haven for the customer more drawn to the unexpected than the abundant, though this is not the entire purpose of the property. Ryhanen’s respect for nature informs the farm, and there are many ways others can get involved in a little cultivation. The farm regularly plays host to work parties and apprenticeships where people can get their hands dirty weeding, planting and playing with dog Nea, whilst eating great home-grown goods, and learning about flower design in the process.


All images courtesy of Winnie Au
worldsendfarm.com
saipua.com

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Art&Culture

ISSUE NINE — PRE-ORDER NOW

In our Spring issue, there’s much to be in high spirits about. We go behind the scenes of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, a movie fuelled by dopamine, alpha dogs, and a vast crew of artisans and animators. We hang with a pack of trippy-looking poodles created by artist Susumu Kamijo. We find five mutts who changed history by injecting their human counterparts with a good dose of serotonin. There is plenty of oxytocin going around, too. We celebrate Sulek’s photography of rescued Spanish galgos, Jo Longshurst’s abstract twist on pet portraiture, and Ho Hai Tran’s love of stripes and spots. We travel to Berlin, Toronto, London, and upstate New York to meet creative types whose bonds with their four-legged mates are as heartfelt as they are intoxicating. We ask five foodies to fess up about dog snacks and guilty pleasures that feed body and soul, and we embrace illustrator Apolline Muet’s bear hugs between humans and animals.
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