Art&Culture

HOLY SHREDDED COMIC BOOK, BATMAN!

When Tony Maher discovered the damage his dogs had done to his favourite Batman comics, he didn’t get mad, or even. He got creative.

READ MORE
CLOSE

HOLY SHREDDED COMIC BOOK, BATMAN!

Shoes, doorframes, their own beds: sometimes dogs have the tendency to destroy things we wish they didn’t. When artist Tony Maher sprung his two pups excitedly reveling in the remnants of his Batman comic, Maher didn’t get mad. He laughed first, and then saw the shredded pages in a different light. “My dogs didn’t so much as destroy my comics, as they did reinterpret, or create a new narrative,” Maher says.

Picking up the pieces of ripped up paper, Maher was reminded of Richard Misrach’s images of Playboy magazines found in the Nevada desert riddled with bullet holes. “I couldn’t help but notice how much more violent they seemed now,” Maher says. “The work in MDKB (My Dogs Killed Batman) makes a comment about how we as a society are okay with violence. Don’t get me wrong, I love Batman and many other comic book heroes. But what a lot of people don’t talk about is how violent a lot of the characters and stories are. MDKB highlights this by focusing on an aggressive act that was physically done to the comic itself. To Batman.”

Maher doesn’t actively encourage his hounds to keep eating comics for art’s sake, however they’re quite fond of mail call. “They sit patiently as we go through junk mail waiting for us to hand them something to ‘file’,” Maher says.


tonymaher.net

Tags , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

CLOSE
Art&Culture

ISSUE NINE — PRE-ORDER NOW

In our Spring issue, there’s much to be in high spirits about. We go behind the scenes of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, a movie fuelled by dopamine, alpha dogs, and a vast crew of artisans and animators. We hang with a pack of trippy-looking poodles created by artist Susumu Kamijo. We find five mutts who changed history by injecting their human counterparts with a good dose of serotonin. There is plenty of oxytocin going around, too. We celebrate Sulek’s photography of rescued Spanish galgos, Jo Longshurst’s abstract twist on pet portraiture, and Ho Hai Tran’s love of stripes and spots. We travel to Berlin, Toronto, London, and upstate New York to meet creative types whose bonds with their four-legged mates are as heartfelt as they are intoxicating. We ask five foodies to fess up about dog snacks and guilty pleasures that feed body and soul, and we embrace illustrator Apolline Muet’s bear hugs between humans and animals.
All this, and more, inside the covers.

READ MORE
Art&Culture

Under the cover of darkness

Death and wilderness play a key role in Lorna Evan’s haunting photography.

READ MORE

Best of breeds

Sipke Visser’s new book lifts the lid on the fascinating world of dog shows.

READ MORE
Recommended
Recommended
Products

ALL WELCOME

In the South Korean city of Busan you can now pamper your pet with a stay at Howlpot Care Centre, a new spa for canines.

READ MORE
Recommended
Recommended
Recommended
Recommended
Recommended
Recommended