Art&Culture

WATTS UP, DOG?

A special project for a friend’s wedding sent British illustrator Caz Watts’s career in a new direction.

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WATTS UP, DOG?

Toads were Caz Watts’s first line of defense. After her freshman year studying illustration at the University of the West of England, Watts battled her lack of direction and feelings of inferiority by drawing cartoons of toads in fancy suits. This soon evolved to dogs and, after Watts drew canine characters on table place tags for a friend’s wedding, the commissions started to pour in.

Now, Watts runs an online store stocked with greeting cards, wrapping paper, napkins, and tea towels printed with her designs. Preferring the juxtaposition of soft and gentle watercolour combined with scratchy fine liner for definition, Watts’s style is reminiscent of Ralph Steadman illustrations, but with a humour and personality that’s her own. “I’m not very neat and tidy when I work,” Watts says. “If paint bleeds or lines aren’t quite right, I leave it as it is. It’s all part of the painting and I like that the illustrations aren’t perfect.”


All artwork by Caz Watts
cazwatts.com

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Art&Culture

ISSUE NINE — PRE-ORDER NOW

In our Spring issue, there’s much to be in high spirits about. We go behind the scenes of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, a movie fuelled by dopamine, alpha dogs, and a vast crew of artisans and animators. We hang with a pack of trippy-looking poodles created by artist Susumu Kamijo. We find five mutts who changed history by injecting their human counterparts with a good dose of serotonin. There is plenty of oxytocin going around, too. We celebrate Sulek’s photography of rescued Spanish galgos, Jo Longshurst’s abstract twist on pet portraiture, and Ho Hai Tran’s love of stripes and spots. We travel to Berlin, Toronto, London, and upstate New York to meet creative types whose bonds with their four-legged mates are as heartfelt as they are intoxicating. We ask five foodies to fess up about dog snacks and guilty pleasures that feed body and soul, and we embrace illustrator Apolline Muet’s bear hugs between humans and animals.
All this, and more, inside the covers.

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Art&Culture

Under the cover of darkness

Death and wilderness play a key role in Lorna Evan’s haunting photography.

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Best of breeds

Sipke Visser’s new book lifts the lid on the fascinating world of dog shows.

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