Art&Culture

BLURRED LINES

Clément Sanna is drawn to unusual and, sometimes, uncomfortable topics that blur fact with fiction.

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BLURRED LINES

We normally wouldn’t cover dog racing, but something about Clément Sanna’s photos made us pause, and think. The Polaroid portraits offer few, if any, spatial and temporal clues. It turns out they were taken in the French countryside between 2015 and 2016, but they could have been shot 20, even 50 years ago. “I take portraits of people as they are—with their clothes, their cars, their animals—but with my eye and my way of telling stories,” Sanna explains. “My photography approach is between real and fiction.”

The Lyon-based graphic designer likes to tell stories with photographs, and is often drawn to unusual and, sometimes, uncomfortable topics. The intent here was not to glorify dog racing or its people, but to document the “specific community” that has grown and somehow still endures around the ‘sport’. “For me, both the human and the animal have the same importance in the photo,” Sanna says. “It’s very far from my everyday life and that’s also what fascinates me.”


All images courtesy of Clément Sanna
clementsanna.com
@clement.sanna

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Art&Culture

ISSUE NINE — BUY NOW

In our Spring issue, there’s much to be in high spirits about. We go behind the scenes of Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, a movie fuelled by dopamine, alpha dogs, and a vast crew of artisans and animators. We hang with a pack of trippy-looking poodles created by artist Susumu Kamijo. We find five mutts who changed history by injecting their human counterparts with a good dose of serotonin. There is plenty of oxytocin going around, too. We celebrate Sulek’s photography of rescued Spanish galgos, Jo Longshurst’s abstract twist on pet portraiture, and Ho Hai Tran’s love of stripes and spots. We travel to Berlin, Toronto, London, and upstate New York to meet creative types whose bonds with their four-legged mates are as heartfelt as they are intoxicating. We ask five foodies to fess up about dog snacks and guilty pleasures that feed body and soul, and we embrace illustrator Apolline Muet’s bear hugs between humans and animals.
All this, and more, inside the covers.

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Art&Culture

Under the cover of darkness

Death and wilderness play a key role in Lorna Evan’s haunting photography.

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Best of breeds

Sipke Visser’s new book lifts the lid on the fascinating world of dog shows.

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