THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY — Four&Sons
Art&Culture, Publications

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Faye Moorhouse believes the uglier the better when it comes to dog illustrations.

s READ MORE
CLOSE

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Faye Moorhouse works fast. Too fast, she thinks. “I produce work really quickly, which is sometimes frustrating. That seems like a weird thing to be frustrated by, but I wish I could explore and develop ideas and work for longer.” To combat this, the UK-based freelance illustrator set herself the project of putting together a zine called An A-Z of Dogs. “It forced me to work on an idea for longer than five minutes. Plus it gave me an excuse to paint some dog breeds I’d never painted before.” Moorhouse also paints pet portraits, her own versions of film posters, and illustrations for children’s books and clients like The New York Times. A dog-lover since childhood, the artist often finds herself going back to dogs in her work. “I love animals but dogs just seem amazing to me. They’re incredible animals, so sensitive, perceptive, and intelligent. And also hilarious! I particularly enjoy painting the ugly-looking dogs, or the ones in jumpers.”


All artwork courtesy of Faye Moorhouse
fayemoorhouse.co.uk
fayemoorhouse.tumblr.com
@fayemoorhouse

CLOSE

CELEBRATING FIVE YEARS

A heartfelt thank you to all the photographers, artists, illustrators, and writers who trusted us, dived in, and brought us delight, grace, excitement, courage, wilderness, and wonder over the last five years. Their work not only reflects the bonds we share with our animal companions, it also celebrates their spirit.

None of this would be possible without our four-legged counterparts who sprinkle magic dust time and time again, and our readers, who embraced this kooky idea, rallied around us, and made this world theirs too. With friends like these, who needs nine lives?

THE CALL OF THE WILD

Harrison Ford has taken on a role that was portrayed in the past by Clark Gable, Charlton Heston, and Rutger Hauer before him: the character John Thornton in the latest cinematic adaptation of Jack London’s 1903 novel The Call of the Wild. John Thornton becomes a human companion to Buck, the big St Bernard-Scotch collie mix who’s the heart of the story. The two meet in Yukon, Canada during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush, and head off on an adventure into the great unknown together. Interestingly, Buck was portrayed using motion capture by Terry Notary, who you might recognise from that dinner scene in 2017’s Palme d’Or winning film The Square. Watch The Call of the Wild on Google Play, iTunes, and more.

Loading...
Loading more posts...